A Short Course Book
Displaying & Sharing
Your Digital Photos

Oil Paintings—Going Full Circle in Retro Mode

 
Here is the original photo taken with a digital camera and then e-mailed to a painter in China.

One thing that makes many photographers bite their tongue is well-meaning people telling them that their photographs are so good they look like paintings. Although photography has been a major art form for almost 200 years, many people still hold paintings in much higher regard. To test this theory I sent one of my photos to China and had it duplicated as a 4 foot by 3 foot oil painting for about $250. The local gallery then sold it for $1600, a price no one would consider paying for a photographic print from anyone but a widely recognized artist. Not only is it inexpensive to try this out, it's fun to go retro since for years photographers have been photographing paintings so they could be reproduced.

 
Here is the huge 48 x 36 oil painting on high quality canvas that was rolled up and sent to me by post. Notice how the artist even put detail into the moon using a separate photo that I sent them.

Here is the huge 48 x 36 oil painting on high quality canvas that was rolled up and sent to me by post. Notice how the artist even put detail into the moon using a separate photo that I sent them.

When you do this, you are gambling since you don't really know what quality to expect. It's best to enter into the transaction in the spirt of adventure and be willing to tray a few sources until you find one you like. Most painters require a down payment, with full payment due when the painting is finished. Our artist sent us a photo of the partially completed painting so we could confirm that the quality of the work was acceptable. Payment was made using a bank transfer, a fairly expensive process. However, many painters accept payment over Paypal.

To locate a painter, use Google, and then visit the painter's Web site to see the quality of his or her work. When you find someone you like, e-mail them a small copy of the image to get an estimate.

The landscape worked out so well, I sent a photo of Emily to the same painter to see how good they were with portraits. The photo shows Emily at the Moondance Diner in Manhattan, reflected in a mirror.

Since we liked one half of the painting better than the other, we framed only that section.
 
If interested in finding a source, write denny@shortcourses.com and I will send you up-to-date advice.

People have all kinds of photos painted in oils—their house, car, boat, pet, boat, children or events. Based on our experience you may want to start with landscapes since you'll be less critical of any differences between the photo and painting. When it comes to portraits, people can be very critical, especially when it's a painting of them self or someone they know.

When you send your image for a quote ask them if they can make changes such as softening wrinkles, removing telephone wires, or adding flowers to the window boxes. Unless directed otherwise, these painters will do their best to give you an exact copy of what you send.


Home  |  Shortcourses™ Bookstore  |  Curtin's Guide to Digital Cameras and Other Photographic Equipment  |  Using Your Digital Camera  |  Displaying & Sharing Your Digital Photos  |  Digital Photography Workflow  |  Image Sensors, Pixels and Image Sizes   |  Digital Desktop Lighting   |  
Hot Topics/ About Us


Site designed by Steve Webster and created by i-Bizware solutions, freelance web development, Anil Dada Warbhe, Website development iBizware Solutions, India.iBizware Solutions, India.